Silverdale Holiday

Silverdale, Lancashire. 21-28 Aug 2015

Cow's Mouth, Silverdale and Morecambe Bay from Jack Scout
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We stayed for a week in a holiday let called Bay View, a large house in Elmslack at the north of Silverdale, with our elder son and a group of Ashram friends, eating breakfast and evening meals (which we took turns in preparing) together and going out in various groups during the day.

The weather forecast had been pretty dire. Rain, rain and more rain, but in the end it was really fairly good, with fairly little rain during the day though some pretty wet nights. Most days we went out walking - and Silverdale has some fine scenery for walks in the area.

The house was amazing, with paintings (including quite a few originals from Tasmania), sculptures and more. Our bedroom had a jacuzzi with a view over Morecambe Bay, but the house had obviously been neglected for quite a while, and the owner was a tax exile who was trying to sell it - yours with rather a large and overgrown garden for around £700,000.

I think it had about a dozen bedrooms, though the layout was rather confusing. Some were pretty poky and only one more had a tub with a view, though some others - like ours - had a rather frightening steam shower. But quite a few things didn't work, or not properly, and we had to have the manager and an electrician in to get most of the electrics working - and they gave up on some.

Our view from the tub - or the other windows would have been better without the creeper covering parts of them - and making its way inside through one of the windows; even after I pulled a lot of it off, the window wouldn't quite shut. Fortunately it was warm enough at nights that we wanted it slightly open.

Silverdale is quite rightly designated an area of outstanding natural beauty and we did our best to explore it. *On Saturday we went down to the shore then walked partly along it and partly in the woods to Arnside, returning over Arnside Knott and past Arnside Tower. On Sunday morning while some went to church Sam and I walked to The Cove, The Shore and Woodwell, near where I had a close encounter with an owl, and in the afternoon we went to Jack Scout and Jenny Brown's Point. Monday we did the Bicentennial walking trail around SIlverdale Village and went to The Cove for sunset; Tuesday we walked to the station and took the train to Ulverston, waling along the canal and up to the 'lighthouse'. Wednesday we had an old friend visiting for the day, and went with her to some of the more scenic parts we had previously visited on Sunday afternoon. And on Thursday we walked to Arnside before making a wide sweep around the country and coming back via Leighton Moss and Barton Well.

*Links are to pages on which the days pictures start, though sometimes well down the page
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Stanwell Moor Walk

Stanwell Moor, Middx. Mon 17 Aug 2015
Hithermoor Lake on a former gravel quarry is a part of the Stanwell Flood diversion scheme
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We visited a house in Stanwell Moor which has a full-size church organ in its living room - as well as a harpsichord and a pianola, and after an entertaining demonstration of the instruments there (it is open to visits by appointment only) took a short walk around the River Colne at the west of the village.

The Colne valley includes a complicated series of waterways, some ancient and others less so. A diagram on Wikipedia shows the main streams, but there are many other channels. A water molecule flowing downstream has a choice of exits to the Thames (and often several routes to reach these) between Hythe End (opposite Egham), in central Staines where the main river ends, at Sunbury via the River Ash, or futher to the east along the Longford River built to supply water to Bushy Park and Hampton Court, or it can follow the Duke of Northumberland's River to mingle with the River Crane before ending at the Isleworth mouths of these two streams. Until they developed Staines town centre, it could even, thanks possibly to the Romans, have flowed at the bottom of my garden to emerge a mile or two on at Penton Hook.

The latest (I think) of many diversions to the route is at Stanwell Moor, where in 2002 the Stanwell Diversion Flood Alleviation Scheme was completed, making a new stream divert some of the waters of the River Colne along a new Hithermoor Stream starting from just to the northwest of Stanwell Moor village. Excess flood water is diverted by it away from the main river and dives under this in a syphon into a former gravel pit, Hithermoor Lake, now a fishing pond, and is then returned to the main river almost a mile from where it left, to the southwest of Stanwell Moor. It's something that defeats the makers of maps, including the Ordnance Survey.

The scheme was designed to make flooding of the village, which had previously occured around every ten years, to a once in a hundred years event. It appeared to work in 2003, when there was flooding around the area but apparently not in Stanwell Moor.

It was a pleasant short walk, alongside the river and past the lake on a narrow strip between the two, but without a great deal to photograph. But for the noise of planes taking off from neighbouring Heathrow and traffic on the M25 a few hundred yards away, though seldom visible for the trees, you could have been in the country.

Unfortunately Stanwell Moor now only has one pub, and that was not serving food, and we had to go back to The Bell in Staines for a pub meal.
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BlackoutLDN solidarity with Black US victims

Grosvenor Square, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015
Bro Jeffrey Muhammad of the Nation of Islam speaking about police targetting attacks on the Black community in the UK
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Two young women, one black and one white, Kayza Rose & Denise Fox, organised a peaceful static protest close to the US embassy in solidarity with events across the US against the collective and systemic unlawful arrests and killings/attacks of black people in America.

The protest appropriately took place under the statue of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the longest serving US President, architect of the New Deal, which attracted a great deal of support from minority communities in the USA. His wartime Executive Order 8802, which banned discrimination on account of "race, creed, color, or national origin" in the hiring workers in defense related industries was an important step in raising the incomes and status of many African Americans and anticipated later Civil Rights legislation. He was a staunch opponent of lynchings ("a vile form of collective murder") and worked with civil rights groups against police brutality and voting rights abuses. But he was unable to command a poliltical majority for the serious civil rights reforms he wanted to make, being opposed by both Republicans and Southern Democrats.

FDR's statue is on top of a tall pillar, the front of which was decorated with pictures of some of the victims of police brutality, with the message 'Gone But Not Forgotten...' People in the crowd had brought a number of posters. One read 'Yes, All Lives Matter, but we are focussed on the Black ones because it is very apparent that our judicial system does not know this' and another stated 'Pro-Black isn't Anti-White'. At one point in the rally, people were asked to get out their phones and tweet that 'Black Lives Matter' with the hashtag #BlackoutLDN.

The protest was supported by groups including BARAC (Black Activists Rising Against Cuts) and the Nation of Islam, and as well as speeches there were songs and poems. Unfortunately I could not stay for the lighting of the many candles that were on the steps of the monument.
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United Voices - Reinstate the Sotheby's 2

Mayfair, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015
A police office tells Sandy Nicoll to get up and off the road with no success
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The United Voices of the World marched noisily around the block at Sotheby's demanding reinstatement of Barbara and Percy, cleaners sacked for protesting for proper sick pay, paid holidays and pensions. Several police attempts to clear the road and stop them failed.

The protesters from the UVW and supporters including those from SOAS Unison, the National Gallery strikers, Class War and others met at Oxford Circus and marched into Mayfair. Police stopped them outside Sotheby's and tried to move them onto the pavement, but they sat down on the road, staying there despite repeated requests to move.

After a few minutes they got up and marched around the block, with Vera and Petros going into shops and handing out leaflets explaining why the UVW were continuing to take action against Sotheby's and asking shop owners and workers to complain to Sotheby's. Some were sympathetic, but police tried to stop the two of them entering shops, and some arguments ensued.

The march returned to the the front of Sotheby's in Old Bond St, where again the police tried to move them off the road with no success. After a short rally they protesters decided to march around the block again, and police attempted to stop them marching, holding UVW leader Petros Elia, and blocking the road, but other protesters simply walked past them on the pavement and marched around the block again. After a short further rally in front of Sotheby's they decided it was time to finish the protest and marched off towards Oxford Circus, packing away their banners and flags in a side street.
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16th 'Stay Put' Sewol silent protest

Trafalgar Square, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

A woman holds a poster in Korean at the silent vigil
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The monthly silent protest remembered the victims of the ferry tragedy, mainly school children who obeyed the order to 'Stay Put' on the lower decks as the ship went down. They demand that the Korean government raise the Sewol ferry for a thorough inquiry and punish those responsible, bringing in special anti-disaster regulations.
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Kurdish PJAK remembers its martyrs

Trafalgar Square, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

Kurds hold hold PJAK flags and images of the martyrs killed fighting ISIS and Iran
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Iranian Kurds from the Party of Free Life of Kurdistan (PJAK) remembered its fighters killed in the fight against Iran and ISIS for self-determination. Like the PKK, PJAK owes allegiance to Abdullah Öcalan and the ideals of the Rojava revolution.
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Kashimiris Indian Independence Day call for freedom

Indian High Commission, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

The protest grew rather heated, with men jumping up and down and shouting
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Kashmiris protested at the Indian High Commission on Independence Day, observed as 'black day' in Indian military occupied Kashmir. They want freedom for their country, now a disputed territory with areas occupied by India, Pakistan and China.

Kashmiris say that Indian Kashmir is one of the most militarized place in the world with an army civilian ratio stands at 70 to 1000 and that more than 100,000 people have been killed since the current uprising against Indian occupation began in 1987. Laws such as Armed Forces Special Power Act adds into the suppression of civilians of which over 8,000 have been buried in unmarked graves. Torture is used as a mean to get confessions and terrorize the civilians including women and children.

Pakistan is less repressive, with fewer violations of human rights, but has also adopted a policy of continuous suppression, exploitation and bullying of Kashmiris in Azad Kashmir and Gilgit Baltistan through a thick network of intelligence agencies. more pictures

Sikhs call for release of political prisoners

Indian High Commission, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

Sikh men and women took part in the protest on Indian Independence day, calling for independence
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On Indian Independence Day, Sikh protesters from Dal Khalsa supported the call by hunger striker Bapu Surat Singh for the release of Sikh political prisoners and for the '2020' campaign for a referendum for an independent Sikh state, Khalistan.

82 year old Bapu Surat Singh Khalsa went on hunger strike on 16th January calling for the release of Sikh political prisoners and other prisoners of all religions who have completed their terms.who have completed their jail terms. He has now been on huger strike for over 200 days.

Many held up posters of Gajinder Singh, a founding member Dal Khalsa which calls for an independent Sikh state, Khalistan. He has been in exile from Panjab since 1981 after hijacking a plane in protest of the arrest of Saint Solider Shaheed Sant Bhindranwale, for which he was imprisoned in Pakistan.

The protesters are also campaignin for 'Referendum 2020' which would ask the Sikh diaspora to express their opinion on a statement that says, "I aspire for the formation of a sovereign and independent country in Indian occupied Punjab, on the basis that Sikhs are the indigenous people of Punjab, have a historical homeland, a separate religion and have the right to self-determination". Referendum 2020 will be held in the state of Punjab and among Sikh diaspora living in America, Canada, United Kingdom, European Union, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Kenya and Middle Eastern Countries.
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Equalitate at Tate Modern

Tate Modern, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

Vicky of Equalitate holds up their flyer calling for equal pay and conditions
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Privatised visitor assistants at Tate Modern & Tate Britain get £3 an hour less than directly employed colleagues, are on zero hours contracts and do not get the same employment rights.

They leafleted on the busy riverside walk outside the gallery calling for equal pay and conditions for outsourced and in-house workers at London Tate Galleries. The EqauliTate flyer has a image of Tate Modern on one side; the other states privatised staff doing the same job as those directly employed have zero hours contracts, get £3 an hour less, and do not get decent pensions, sick pay and holidays. This was the first time that they have held a public protest like this, and the response from the people walking past was positive. Many of them however were tourists and not UK residents.
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London Views

London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

The City from the Millennium Bridge
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As I travelled around London between the various events I had time to take a few pictures.
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National Gallery 61st day of Strike

Trafalgar Square, London. Sat 15 Aug 2015

Candy Udwin, sacked for her trade union activities, speaks at the rally
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A short rally ended the daily picket on the 61st day of the PCS strike against privatisation at the National Gallery, with speeches and messages of support. They hope soon to have a meeting with the new director who starts on Monday.


Victimised PCS union rep Candy Udwin and others spoke at the rally, which was suported by other groups of trade unionists including Unison members in the London Fiare Brigade. Despite the reservations he expressed about the privatisation, outgoing director Nicholas Penny has signed the contract.
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Marikana Mine Murders protest at Investec

Gresham St, London. Fri 14 Oct 2015

A woman hands out fliers about the murders and Investec's responsibility
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On the third anniversary of the killing of 34 Lonmin workers in the Marikana Massacre, protesters urged Investec, a major shareholder, to pressure the company to pay compensation, pay a living wage, implement its housing promises and pay its taxes.

Investec Asset Management holds 5.16% of the shares of Lonmin, a principal actor in the Marikana Massacre on 16th August 2012 where 34 of its employees were shot dead and 78 injured by the police in an operation that took place with the cooperation and at the prompting of the company. Their part in it was recognised by the Farlam Commission, though it caused international outrage by failing to recommend criminal prosecutions.

The protest on the 3rd anniversary of the killings was organised by the Marikana Miners Solidarity Campaign(UK) and called on Investec to use its shareholder voting rights to ensure that LONMIN:

• Apologises to and properly compensate the families of the killed miners;
• Pays the mineworkers a living wage of 12,500 Rand per month as determined by the AMCU and NUM trade unions;
• Implements the promises on housing made to the World Bank -s ofar only 3 of the promised 5,500 houses have been built;
• Stops using a transfer pricing mechanism with a Bermuda company set up to avoid paying its full corporation tax in South Africa.

After an hour or so of protest a letter with these demands was handed in to Investec, and the protesters moved on to protest at South Africa House, where a small group went inside for a scheduled meeting. I left before this was finished.
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Class War protest Ripper 'museum' again

Cable St, London. Wed 12 Aug 2015

'Violence against women should not be celebrated. Shut it Down!'
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For a second week Class War, feminists and local residents protested outside the museum saying it falsifies history and celebrates violence against women. Police and security guarded the shop which was closed behind a large metal shutter.

There were a few short speeches, and then David Rosenberg, who leads walks in the area on East End history, talked about the real history of women here that the Jack the Ripper museum pretended to be about to gain planning permission, including their contribution at this spot to the battle of Cable St.

This was a noisy protest, and after letting off a smoke flare, the protesters draped 'Crime Scene - Do Not Enter tape across the police van and the front of the shop were police and security were lined up. The protesters blocked most of the road, but did occasionally let traffic through, though the police made no attempt to clear them.

As before, Class War were joined by Action East End and Fourth Wave and other feminists in the protest, as well as local residents, some of whom had not realised before the protest what the new museum was about, and were apalled when they learnt, promising to join any further protests.
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Close Down Yarl's Wood

Yarl's Wood Immigration prison, Bedford. Sat 8 Aug 2015


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Around a thousand protesters in a field adjioning the detention centre joined with detainees locked up in Yarl's Wood to demand an end to immigration detention and the whole racist system which locks up migrants and asylum seekers without trial, subjecting them to abuse and sexual harassment.

Coaches came from around the country to drop protesters outside the business estate on a former aerodrome in the middle of the country around five miles from Bedford, and a coach from Bedford Station made two journeys from there to bring myself and the others who had arrived by train. Others made their journey there by taxi, car and bicycle, and a few by bus, which dropped them at the centre of a village around a mile away.

The protest was organised by Movement for Justice and there is a long list of other groups that supported it and the campaign to close detention centres, though I think there were also others present: Women for Refugee Women, Right To Remain, CheltFems, Black Women’s Rape Action Project, All African Womens Group, Refugee Support Devon, Exeter City of Sanctuary, London Palestine Action, Diásporas Criticas, South London Anti Fascists, No One Is Illegal, Jewish Socialist Group, Left Unity, CUSU Women's Campaign, Freedom Without Fear Platform, Black Dissidents, Feminist Fightback, Women's Association for the Guild of Students, University of Birmingham, Unite Hotel Workers Branch, Plan C, Birmingham, Leeds Feminist Network, Sisters Uncut, SOAS Unison.

The protest started next to the road at the front of the estate to give time for all the protesters to arrive, and then walked along a public bridleway which goes close to the detention centre. The protesters were allowed into a field which ran along the side of the high fence around the centre for today's protest - at a previous protest they had pushed down fences and breached barbed wire to get to the fence.

There was a rapturous welcome from the women inside the prison, who came to the windows, shouting and waving and holding up signs. Protests like this really give the prisoners hope, and show them they have support and are not forgotten. Together, inside and out people chanted slogans 'Shut Down Yarls Wood', 'Detention Centres, Shut them Down' and more.

A small rise in the field help us see the windows on the first floor and above despite the fence, solid for around 10 ft with another 10 ft of mesh on top. People banged it to make a noise, kicked it, and banged it with pots and pans, and some climbed on others shoulders to lift up banners and placards so those inside could see.

Then a group of people wearing face masks began to write slogans on the fence, and soon a long length of it was covered with them 'No Borders', 'No One is Illegal' '#SetHerFree', 'Shut it Down', 'Gaza 2 Yarls Wood Destroy Apartheid Walls', 'Racist Walls' and more.

Inside the women waved. The windows open to a small gap and one woman waved her leg though it, decorated with paper tied around. Others waved clothing and held up signs, some with slogans like those held up and shouted by the people outside. One carefully drawn one read 'We Want Freedom - No Human Is Illegal - Close Yarls Wood' while another simply read 'Help'.

The organisers had mobile numbers for some of those inside - and others inside wrote theirs large and held them up in the window. We were able to hear greetings and reports from some of those inside, their voices on the phone amplified on the megaphone.

They too could hear the speeches from outside, including several by women who had been held with them inside the prison. Many are held for long periods in this and other detention centres, never knowing when they might be let out - or an attempt made to send them back to the country they were desperate to escape from.

Too soon we had to leave. And they had to stay. As I walked away to catch the coach back to Bedford station I felt ashamed at the way that my country treats asylum seekers. They deserve support and humanity and get treated worse than criminals.
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Hiroshima Remembered 70 Years On

Tavistock Square, London, Thu 6 Aug 2015

Jeremy Corbyn stood for a few moments in thought after laying a sunflower at the foot of the tree
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Jeremy Corbyn, often the compère of the annual Hiroshima commemoration was today the main speaker, along with Bruce Kent, A L Kennedy, Rev S Nagase, Jenny Jones and others. As usual flowers were laid at the Hiroshima cherry tree in Tavistock Sq.

Because of the Labour leadership contest, the event which usually attracts only a small handful of press was today attended by several TV crews and a large number of photographers, many of whom more or less ignored anything but Jeremy Corbyn.
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Class War protest Jack the Ripper 'Museum'

Cable St, London. Wed 5 Aug 2015
Lisa McKenzie holds up the megaphone and shouts outside the Jack the Ripper 'museum'
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Women from Class War led a noisy protest outside the museum, promising to return until it was shut down, saying it falsified history and celebrated violence against women.

The planning application for the museum stated that it was the "first women’s museum in the UK" and that:

"The museum will recognise and celebrate the women of the East End who have shaped history, telling the story of how they have been instrumental in changing society."

“It will analyse the social, political and domestic experience from the Victorian period to the present day.”

A number of people gave advice or worked for free or at cost because they supported the project on this basis, and feel disgusted at how they were duped. People who have seen the museum have been revolted at its sensational presentation of violent crimes against women. One of the politer comments was to call it "salacious, misogynist rubbish."

The protest was also supported by local groups including feminists and East End Action. After protesting on the pavement for some while the protesters blocked the road, though leaving space for cyclists to pass. Police attempted to move them with no success, the women protesting asking them whether they would defend a museum celebrating the murders of police officers. The shop front was decorated with stickers and a small pane of glass broken.
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Foil Vedanta at mining giant's AGM

Ironmongers' Hall, London. Mon 3 Aug 2015

Protesters with the Vedanta monster and posters outside the AGM

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Protesters at Vedanta AGM continued the fight by communities around the world against the mining giant, including Zambians who have won a Supreme Court battle over pollution and the Dongria Kond demanding the dismantling of the Lanjigarh refinery.

Protests against Vedanta were taking place Chingola and Lusaka in Zambia and five Indian cities to coincide with its annual meeting in London, where shareholder protesters went inside and others protested outside the meeting.

Protesters at the AGM of Vedanta, notorious for its envrionmental and human rights abuses around the world included two figures wearing inflatable chub suits and masks of Vedanta owner Anil Agarwal and Vedanta Resources CEO Tom Albanese.

The protest started on the road outside, but soon after it was joined by the 'Vedanta Monster' made its way to the open yard in front of the Ironmongers' Hall, while police and secuirty watched. Police made sure that those attending the meeting were able to walk through, and the protesters offered them leaflets about the environmental and human rights abuses of the company and its relationship with Indian PM Narendra Modi, which many took.

At one point the Vedanta Monster, its limbs bearing the names of the various Vedanta companies, was pelted by the protesters with bananas, and the yard began to get rather slippery. But it was soon cleared up.
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Nitrous Oxide - 'My Mind, My choice!'

Parliament Square, London. Sat 1 Aug 2015

People inhaled nitrous oxide from their balloons as Big Ben struck three
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Protesters against prohibition of psychoactive substances in the Psychoactive Substances Bill came to Parliament Square for a mass inhalation of nitrous oxide with the message 'My Mind, My choice!'

The government's proposed Psychoactive Substances Bill would create the offences of "Supplying a psychoactive substance" and "Possession of a psychoactive substance with intent to supply", although some of the most dangerous substances, alcohol and nicotine would be exempt, along with caffeine.

Nitrous oxide inhalation can be dangerous, but only in large quantities when the body gets insufficient oxygen and asphyxiates. 'Laughing gas', as it is commonly known, has been used for many years as an anaesthetic, particularly in dentistry, and proper inhalation from a balloon eliminates the main danger of taking it. It is also used in some food packaging as a safe way to stop food going bad, including aerosols of whipped cream. Nitrous oxide is totally different to Nitric oxide, a toxic chemical is in vehicle exhausts and is a major factor in the dangerous air pollution in city streets.

Pupils used to be invited to try to inhale it in school chemistry lessons, though doubtless that is now outlawed under health and safety regulations. At the protest people followed the safety rules in taking it - inhaling from a ballon, sitting down, extinguishing cigarettes, and not chewing gum. It can apparently cause problems with those who suffer from low blood pressure and like all drugs, should not be taken by those suffereing from mental health issues. It can also deplete the body's supplies of vitamin B12 and users are recommended to take a vitamin supplement.

Nitrous oxide is almost certainly less dangerous than legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco, and experience in other countries has shown that attempts to ban it and other psychoactive substances are generally ineffectual and drive the trade underground. In Poland where they brought in a ban five years ago, there was an immediate brief drop in deaths, but after three years these were at the same level and are now higher.
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Focus E15 and Boleyn Ground campaign together

Stratford Broadway, London. Sat 1 Aug 2015

Focus E15 campaigners protest and collect signatures for their petition here every week
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Campaigners from Focus E15 and Boleyn Ground campaigned together at Stratford calling for Newham to provide much-needed social housing in the borough before an open discussion with East London campaigns about further actions.

Focus E15 have been campaigning on housing issues for almost two years after women at the Focus E15 hostel were served eviction notices. They successfully fought Newham Council's plans to send them to various privated rented accomodation outside London where they had famiily, friends and support and went on to highlight the failures of Newham Council to provide housing for the people of the borough.

Newham, led by Mayor Robin Wales, started clearing tenants from the Carpenters Estate close to Stratford Centre over ten years ago, and many properties there have been left empty despite the desperate housing shortage. Plans to demolish the estate and sell it off to University College London fell through after protests by the remaining residents and students, and pressure by Focus E15 who occupied a block of properties last year have forced the council to let some of the empty properties.

Focus E15 have protested against Robin Wales at various events and have been assaulted while doing so. They have also protested to prevent evictions and to get other local people who the council wanted to send to Birmingham and elsewhere rehoused locally.

At today's protest they had 'Robin Wales selfie sticks' with an image of the Mayor and invited people to take and post a 'selfie' of themselves with him. A new version of 'Robin Hood' was made up and sung, with variations:

Robin Wales, Robin Wales, riding through Newham
Robin Wales, Robin Wales, doesn't give a damn
Steals from the poor, gives to the rich
Off our patch, out of town
Robin Wales

They were also talking with other campaigners including those in the Boleyn Ground campaign who came to join them about how to campaign to get more council housing in the area, and handing out leaflets about their March Against Evictions in Stratford on 19 September.
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Boleyn ground fight for Social Housing

Queen's Market, Upton Park, London. Sat 1 Aug 2015

Friends of Queen's Market campaign for social housing on West Ham's Boleyn ground
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Friends of Queens Market, who saved the market from Newham's development plans, campaigned for West Ham's Boleyn ground to be developed for some of the 24,000 on Newham's housing list rather than as 838 luxury apartments with no social housing, handing out leaflets and collecting signatures on a petition outside the busy Queen's Market.

Developer Galliard plans to turn West Ham Stadium into a 'luxury village' with 0% social housing, but local people have different ideas and Newham Council have failed to oppose their plans.
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my london diary index
 

Aug 2015

Silverdale Holiday
Stanwell Moor Walk
BlackoutLDN solidarity with Black US victims
United Voices - Reinstate the Sotheby's 2
16th 'Stay Put' Sewol silent protest
Kurdish PJAK remembers its martyrs
Kashimiris Independence Day call for freedom
Sikhs call for release of political prisoners
Equalitate at Tate Modern
London Views
National Gallery 61st day of Strike
Marikana Mine Murders protest at Investec
Class War protest Ripper 'museum' again
Close Down Yarl's Wood
Hiroshima Remembered 70 Years On
Class War at Jack the Ripper 'Museum'
Foil Vedanta at mining giant's AGM
Nitrous Oxide - 'My Mind, My choice!'
Focus E15 & Boleyn Ground campaign together
Boleyn ground fight for Social Housing

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